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A new survey from Manhattan Research shows that almost half of all healthcare consumers would be interested in having access to view their electronic health records (EHRs) and an unprecedented 24% of them already have.

They survey found that of the roughly 8,700 American adults asked, 24% had accessed their own EHR through a physician, hospital, or insurance company. 17% more of them would like to have this capability. Astonishingly, 59% of those surveyed have not used and have no interest in accessing their own electronic records.

…contine reading »

  • By Kevin Hauser Submitted on October 25th, 2011

Family, friends, customers and employees of MedeFile International were profoundly saddened to learn of the passing of MedeFile’s founder Milton Hauser on October 16, 2011.  For those who knew Milt, you will remember him as a vibrant man of immense charm, infectious, even child-like enthusiasm and an unrelenting passion for making a positive difference in every life he touched.

With an easy smile and booming laugh, he adored his family and friends, he loved life, and he lived it to the fullest. Moreover, Milt’s perseverance and uncompromising dedication to empowering people with the means to take control of their medical records became his life’s mission, and now serves as an enduring legacy that strengthens and fuels our commitment and resolve to achieve global success and prosperity. While there are no words that can adequately express how much we will miss him, all of us at MedeFile will remain focused on realizing Milt’s grand vision for our Company, helping millions of people to live longer, healthier and happier lives.  Knowing this, Milt is certainly still smiling.

 

  • By medefile Submitted on October 17th, 2011

It was big news when the Kaiser Family Foundation’s 13th annual survey of small and large employers was released. Most of the news focused on the costs of employer-sponsored health care plans increasing 9% over 2010 (to $15,073 average). Most noted that the health care overhaul pushed by President Obama was to blame, but not always the reason why. The largest reason was the provision for adult children up to age 26 being allowed onto their parents’ health care plan, which prompted one of the largest new groups of covered individuals (18-26) in recent history – more than 2 million of them in 2011 alone.

Another reason for the rate increases are health insurance providers and underwriters leveraging themselves against next year’s requirement that they justify any increase higher than 10%. In the near-term (the next 2-3 years), insurers know that raising rates will be very difficult, so they are doing so now, before the law takes effect, in order to set themselves up for smaller hikes in the next couple of years. That this is happening is all but acknowledged by the industry.

…contine reading »

  • By Kevin Hauser Submitted on October 10th, 2011

Articles with titles similar to this one are peppering the Internet and media. Most of them are talking about health care reform and how it will or won’t save or ruin America. This blog isn’t about that. I’m going to talk about the industry itself and where it’s going and how you, as a patient or health care provider, are going to see changes in the next few years. Changes that will affect everything from the doctor’s office to the hospital and, yes, even the insurance industry too.

There’s a huge revolution in healthcare right now, but few outside of the industry are talking about it. That revolution is the long-awaited movement into the 21st century. Healthcare is finally latching onto mainstream IT and consumer advocacy in a way it’s never done before.

…contine reading »

  • By Kevin Hauser Submitted on October 3rd, 2011